BERTO FOR TAC WORKWEAR: #INTERVIEW
Can you recall the exact moment when you decided to become a fashion designer?

I have a passion for needle and thread since I was a child. After graduating in architecture with a master's degree at Milan Polytechnic University, I started sewing as a dressmaker for high fashion atelier. Knowing and meeting people in Milan, I realized that chefs' creativity is not represented by its workwear, which has remained the same over the years. So I came up with the idea of making kitchen aprons, dedicated to the artisans who love their work.
Fabrics like denim are born as a work garment, used to protect workers during hard and difficult activities. This idea of using a durable fabric for a quality garment can reduce consumption and consequently reduce pollution.
What was your first project?

One day, a friend of mine asked me to make a "special" apron for him, it was a kind of joke. From this I realized that the artisans who create beautiful and unique things need more style in their aprons without giving up quality and strength of a product! That's how I started my TAC atelier.

The creative process: do you work in an instinctive way or do you plan every single step? Where do your ideas come from?

Depending on the client, I apply both processes, adapting my models according to the needs of each client, paying attention to each detail: pockets, small metal parts, threads and colorful ribbons (which are my style mark, as if they were ties).

What did you think when you have been contacted by Berto first?

A friend of mine who works in high fashion textiles suggested me to have a look at #Berto4youngtalents project on the company website.

Which Berto’s fabrics have you been working with for your project/collection?

I worked with seven different Berto denim fabrics: Reverse bull, Dandy blue, Selvedge spell gray, Janis 4 and Janis 5, History glory and Flower print.

“Less but better” could be read as an endorsement for purity in design but in fashion design too. It can also be adopted as an environmental message about reduction and sustainability. What do you think about this?

I try to use the best work fabrics, at the same time functional, beautiful and durable. Fabrics like denim are born as a work garment, used to protect workers during hard and difficult activities. This idea of using a durable fabric for a quality garment can reduce consumption and consequently reduce pollution.

Is there anything you'd like to do that you haven't done yet?

I'm going to create a new line of garments dedicated to chefs, in particular jackets with a less classic look. I would like to make them with your denim fabrics.

http://tacworkwear.it/